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  • News | Tokyo 1964

    Tokyo 1964 welcomes the world to the Olympic Stadium

    Under a magnificent blue autumn sky, the Opening Ceremony of the Games of the XVIII Olympiad was filled with exciting moments, in particular when Japanese athlete Yoshinori Sakai, born on 6 August 1945 and nicknamed “Hiroshima Baby”, lit the Olympic cauldron in a symbolic gesture of peace and hope. At the end of the Ceremony, Japanese jet planes formed the Olympic rings in the sky.   
    10 Oct 2019 | Olympic News, Tokyo 1964, Tokyo 2020
  • News | Olympic News

    Olympic values: Q&A with record-setters Latynina and Fischer

    Ukraine’s Larisa Latynina and Germany’s Birgit Fischer are two of the most successful Olympians of all time, winning a quite extraordinary 30 Olympic medals between them. Here, the gymnast and the kayaker reflect on their respective careers and share tales of Olympism in action. 
    15 Sep 2019 | Olympic News, Rowing, Gymnastics
  • News | Legacy

    Olympic legacies live on in Russia

    As Russia hosts the FIFA World Cup this summer, the legacies of the Olympic Games will be back in the spotlight.
    14 Jun 2018 | Olympic News, Sochi 2014, Legacy
  • News | Olympic News

    Massachusetts - the unlikely birthplace of basketball and volleyball

    Two of the most popular sports on the Olympic programme – basketball and volleyball – each have their origins in the US state of Massachusetts, where they were devised by two pioneering physical education teachers in the 19th century.
    27 Apr 2018 | Olympic News, Basketball, Volleyball
  • News | PyeongChang 2018

    Sharing the golden spoils

    Among the many highlights of PyeongChang 2018 was the heart-stopping conclusion to the two-man bobsleigh, which saw German duo Friedrich and Thorsten Margis and Canada’s Justin Kripps and Alexander Kopacz record identical times over the four runs (3 minutes, 16.86 seconds) to share top spot on the podium. In doing so they became only the ninth joint gold medallists in Olympic Winter Games history. We cast a glance back in time at the other occasions when the gold medals have been shared.
    09 Mar 2018 | Olympic News, PyeongChang 2018, Bobsleigh
  • News | Squaw Valley 1960

    The forgotten "Miracle on ice" at Squaw Valley

    Mention the words “miracle on ice” to ice hockey fans and they will recall the USA’s thrilling and wholly unexpected 4-3 defeat of the USSR at Lake Placid in 1980, a match that has gone down in Olympic history. It was not the first American Olympic ice hockey miracle, however. At Squaw Valley 20 years earlier, a young USA team defied the odds and their more fancied rivals to pull off what has become known as the “Forgotten Miracle”.
    05 Jan 2018 | Olympic News, Squaw Valley 1960, Ice Hockey, United States of America
  • News | Olympic News

    The sabre – the only weapon to have been at every Games since 1896

    Fencing was one of the nine sports on the Olympic programme at the first Games of the modern era in Athens in 1896, with one foil event and one sabre event. The sabre is the only weapon to have been at every edition of the Games, all the way up to Rio 2016. It was, however, the last fencing category to have been opened up to women, in 2004 in Athens.
    25 Sep 2017 | Athens 1896, Athens 2004, Olympic News, Fencing
  • News | RIO 2016

    Rio 2016 - Day 5: King Kohei Uchimura retains his title right at the death

    Relive competition day 5 in Rio – 10 August 2016 – on olympic.org! Kohei Uchimura managed to defend his title in the men’s gymnastics all-around competition after it went down to the wire against Ukraine’s Oleg Vernaiev. Cyclists Fabian Cancellara and Kristin Armstrong secured their status as Olympic legends, as did Aron Szilagyi in the men’s sabre. Katie Ledecky won her third swimming gold medal in Rio.
    10 Aug 2017 | RIO 2016, Olympic News
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