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  • Rome 1960

    Rome 1960

    The Rome 1960 poster, produced by Italian graphic designed Armando Testa, united the past and the present, ancient Rome and modern Rome, which was hosting the Olympic Games. The capital shown on the poster is a reference to the Belvedere capital, and its presence, by alluding to the Caracalla spa, recalls physical activity in Roman times. For the same reasons, the OCOG decided to organise the gymnastics events in this edifice. Copyright : CIO
    Sunday, December 31, 1899 11:00 PM | Photo
  • Rome 1960 Official poster (1)

    Rome 1960 Official poster (1)

    The Rome 1960 poster, produced by Italian graphic designed Armando Testa, united the past and the present, ancient Rome and modern Rome, which was hosting the Olympic Games. The capital shown on the poster is a reference to the Belvedere capital, and its presence, by alluding to the Caracalla spa, recalls physical activity in Roman times. For the same reasons, the OCOG decided to organise the gymnastics events in this edifice. Copyright : CIO
    Sunday, December 31, 1899 11:00 PM | Photo
  • Rome 1960 Official poster

    Rome 1960 Official poster

    The Rome 1960 poster, produced by Italian graphic designed Armando Testa, united the past and the present, ancient Rome and modern Rome, which was hosting the Olympic Games. The capital shown on the poster is a reference to the Belvedere capital, and its presence, by alluding to the Caracalla spa, recalls physical activity in Roman times. For the same reasons, the OCOG decided to organise the gymnastics events in this edifice. Copyright : CIO
    Sunday, December 31, 1899 11:00 PM | Photo
  • Swimmer Duke Kahanamoku Diving

    Swimmer Duke Kahanamoku Diving

    Side view of American swimmer and surfing pioneer Duke Kahanamoku (1890 - 1868) preparing to dive in his fourth Olympic meet, circa 1920. He won gold medals in the 100 meter freestyle event in 1912 and 1920, and was considered the 'father of modern surfing.' (Photo by American Stock/Getty Images)
    Wednesday, December 31, 1919 11:00 PM | Photo
  • The foil

    The foil

    London 2012 - the modern fencing foil is derived from sword training weapons used in the 18th century.
    Thursday, August 2, 2012 3:30 PM | Photo
  • Winter Games Salt Lake City 2002 Medal

    Winter Games Salt Lake City 2002 Medal

    On the obverse, an athlete bursts from flames carrying a torch, representing the resilience of the human spirit and the power to inspire. The figure has triumphed over adversity and is thus released from a mountain of ice and rock. The Olympic Rings anchor the image of the athlete, while the 2002 Games' theme, "Light the Fire Within" is etched into the medal, marking the first time that an organizing committee's vision statement is included on a medal. On the obverse, Nike, the Greek goddess of victory, holds a small victory leaf, symbolizing the olive wreaths that were presented to winners of the ancient Olympic Games. Within Nike's embrace is an illustration of the event for which each medal is being presented. The 2002 Games emblem and the name of the event figure on the obverse of each medal. At the base of the ribbon loop is the Roman numeral XIX, signifying the XIX Olympic Winter Games. The medals are designed in the shape of river rocks, like those found in Utah's streams and rivers. Part modern and part rustic, they embody the spirit of the American West from the forging of the West to the technological present. Each medal is hand-finished and is slightly different from the other medals similar to individual rocks sculpted by water and wind.
    Friday, February 8, 2002 2:30 PM | Photo
  • Summer Games London 2012 Medal

    Summer Games London 2012 Medal

    On the obverse, the traditional goddess of victory flies into the Panathinaikos stadium bringing victory to the best athlete. For these Games, the figure of victory is accompanied by the specific inscription: “XXX Olympiad London 2012”. The reverse features an abstract design with the 2012 Games emblem at its centre as a metaphor for the modern city. The design also includes a ribbon representing London’s Thames river and an interlocking grid pattern that radiates from the centre and pulls the design together, giving it a sense of outreach while also representing the achievements and efforts of Olympic athletes. A square, which encases the balance of the design, opposes the circular shape of the medals and emphasizes its focus on the centre, reinforcing the sense of ‘place, as in a map inset.
    Friday, July 27, 2012 9:30 AM | Photo
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