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IOC/Andre Mourao

Sport has long been recognised as a major contributor to positive health and well-being for participants; however, as a microcosm of society, sport is not immune from wider societal ills.

The IOC firmly believes that harassment and abuse have no place in sport or in society, and advocates for safe sport, as the safety and wellbeing of athletes are paramount.

Sport is global, crossing cultures and laws, but there is only one culture that must apply: the culture of respect.

Since 2004, the IOC has been developing programmes and initiatives to safeguard athletes from harassment and abuse in sport.

The IOC prevention of harassment and abuse in sport (PHAS) initiatives have been established by the following four IOC Commissions:

  • Athletes’ Commission
  • Athletes’ Entourage Commission
  • Medical and Scientific Commission
  • Women in Sport Commission

These IOC Commissions are represented on the IOC Prevention of Harassment and Abuse in Sport (PHAS) Working Group, which is chaired by HRH Prince Feisal Al-Hussein. The IOC PHAS Working Group collaborates with subject matter experts and Olympic Movement stakeholders to develop and implement initiatives to safeguard athletes from harassment and abuse in sport.

TERM CHECK:

Safeguarding: Measures and initiatives which are put in place to PREVENT harassment and abuse

"We must be more determined than ever to protect athletes. One case is one case too many. Together we can make a difference"
- HRH Prince Feisal Al Hussein, Jordan - IOC Member; IOC Women in Sport Commission Vice-Chair & IOC Prevention of Harassment and Abuse in Sport Working Group Chair

What constitutes harassment and abuse?

In the IOC Consensus Statement: Harassment and Abuse in Sport (2016), experts identified five forms of harassment and abuse:

IOC

All forms of harassment and abuse are detrimental to athlete welfare and are against the Olympic values. For the full definitions of harassment and abuse as noted in the IOC Consensus Statement: Harassment and abuse in sport (2016), please click here.

What is the basis for the IOC PHAS initiatives?

The safeguarding of athletes is embedded in the overarching fundamental principles of Olympism found in the Olympic Charter, as well as other foundational documents of the Olympic Movement, including:

IOC Safe Sport initiatives

The IOC Safe Sport initiatives can be split into three main areas. Click on the links to find out more:

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Olympic And Youth Olympic Games-related

The Frameworks in place at the Olympic and Youth Olympic Games through which any reports during Games time can be reported and will be investigated.

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Education and awareness-raising

Specially developed educational tools and awareness-raising materials, which are free to take and share

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Nanjing 2014

Assistance for the Olympic Movement (IOC Athlete Safeguarding Toolkit)

Tools and initiatives to assist National Olympic Committees and International Federations to develop and implement athlete safeguarding policies and procedures

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IOC Athlete Safeguarding Webinar Series

The Webinar Series for International Federations, consisting of 10 two-hour webinars, has been developed to support these organisations with the implementation of policy and athlete safeguarding measures.

Watch here
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