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Summer Games Antwerp 1920 Medal

On the obverse, a tall, naked athlete, holding in his left hand a palm leaf and a laurel crown, symbols of victory. Behind him, the figure of the Renommée playing the trumpet. In the background, a frieze with a Greek motif with the inscription "VII OLYMPIADE" underneath.

On the reverse, the Antwerp monument, commemorating the legend of Brabo throwing into the Scheldt the hand of the giant Druoon Antigoon, who had been terrorizing the river. In the background, the cathedral and port of Antwerp. In the top half, the inscription “ ANVERS MCMXX ”.

The legend says that in Antiquity, this cruel giant forced all vessels on the river to pay a toll. If the captain refused to pay, he cut off his hand. The giant spread terror amongst the sailors for many long years, until the day he met Silvius Brabo. This courageous Roman soldier dared to take on the giant and succeeded in killing him. As revenge for his victims, he cut off the giant's hand and threw it into the river. This is where the name of the city comes from- "Antwerp" means "thrown hand".
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Summer Games London 1948 Medal

On the obverse, the traditional goddess of victory, holding a palm in her left hand and a winner’s crown in her right. A design used since the 1928 Games in Amsterdam , created by Florentine artist Giuseppe Cassioli (ITA - 1865-1942) and chosen after a competition organised by the International Olympic Committee. For these Games, the figure of victory is accompanied by the specific inscription: XIVth OLYMPIAD LONDON 1948 ".

On the reverse, an Olympic champion carried in triumph by the crowd, with the Olympic stadium in the background.
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Winter Games St. Moritz 1948 Medal

On the obverse, in between two snow crystals, the inscription “Vmes JEUX OLYMPIQUES D'HIVER ST.-MORITZ 1948”.

On the reverse, a hand holding a lit torch with the Olympic Rings in the background. Six snow crystals decorate the empty space right and left. At the top, curving round, the motto "CITIUS ALTIUS FORTIUS".
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Winter Games Salt Lake City 2002 Medal

On the obverse, an athlete bursts from flames carrying a torch, representing the resilience of the human spirit and the power to inspire. The figure has triumphed over adversity and is thus released from a mountain of ice and rock. The Olympic Rings anchor the image of the athlete, while the 2002 Games' theme, "Light the Fire Within" is etched into the medal, marking the first time that an organizing committee's vision statement is included on a medal.

On the obverse, Nike, the Greek goddess of victory, holds a small victory leaf, symbolizing the olive wreaths that were presented to winners of the ancient Olympic Games. Within Nike's embrace is an illustration of the event for which each medal is being presented. The 2002 Games emblem and the name of the event figure on the obverse of each medal. At the base of the ribbon loop is the Roman numeral XIX, signifying the XIX Olympic Winter Games.

The medals are designed in the shape of river rocks, like those found in Utah's streams and rivers. Part modern and part rustic, they embody the spirit of the American West from the forging of the West to the technological present. Each medal is hand-finished and is slightly different from the other medals similar to individual rocks sculpted by water and wind.
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Summer Games Rome 1960

Exceptionally, for the Games in Rome, the obverse and the reverse of the medal were inverted. On the obverse, an Olympic champion carried in triumph by the crowd, with the Olympic stadium in the background. On the reverse, the traditional goddess of victory, holding a palm in her left hand and a winner’s crown in her right. A design used since the 1928 Games in Amsterdam, created by Florentine artist Giuseppe Cassioli (ITA - 1865-1942) and chosen after a competition organised by the International Olympic Committee in 1921. For these Games, the figure of victory is accompanied by the specific inscription: "GIOCCHI DELLA XVII OLIMPIADE ROMA MCMLX".

The medals in Rome were set in a circle of bronze featuring a laurel wreath matched with a chain also designed like a sequence of bronze laurel leaves.
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Winter Games Squaw Valley 1960 Medal

On the obverse, the profile of a young woman and, in the background, that of a young man, symbolizing the youth of America and the world. Surrounded by the inscription “VIII OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES”.

The reverse remained sober, with the Olympic rings, with the motto "CITIUS ALTIUS FORTIUS" surrounding the top half. The space in the middle of the bottom half was reserved for the name of the sport, in accordance with the rule of the Olympic Charter in force at that time.
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