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INVITING ARTISTS TO THE GAMES

Recommendation 26 of Olympic Agenda 2020, the Olympic Movement's strategic roadmap, is to "further strengthen the blending of sport and culture at the Olympic Games and in-between". One initiative under this recommendation is to invite artists to create original new work during and between different editions of the Olympic Games. During the Olympic Games Rio 2016, three artists were invited: JR, the French photographer Gerald Andal, the digital artist and Tilman Spengler, the writer.

In PyeongChang 2018, for the first time ever, Olympians who are also artists will take up a different challenge: bring the Olympic values to life through art and by coming together with athletes in the Olympic Village.

These art initiatives echo the first fundamental principle laid down in the Olympic Charter: "Olympism is a philosophy of life, exalting and combining in a balanced whole the qualities of body, will and mind. Blending sport with culture and e­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ducation, Olympism seeks to create a way of life based on the joy of effort, the educational value of good example, social responsibility and respect for universal fundamental ethical principles."

OUR OLYMPIANS ARE ARTISTS!

At the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018, they will bring the olympic values to life through art. A first! They have taken part in the Olympic Games at least once as athletes and they are artists. In Pyeongchang, they will not be in contention for a medal, but they will bring the olympic values to life through art and by coming together with athletes in the Olympic Village. Olympians Alexi Pappas (10 km runner), Roald Bradstock (javelin thrower), Lanny Barnes (biathlete) and Jean-Blaise Evequoz (fencer) are the “Olympian artists” at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games.

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« Olympic Dreams »

« Olympic Dreams » created by Alexi Pappas and Jeremy Teicher.

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Painting the Olympic values

With Roald BRADSTOCK (UK), Lanny BARNES (USA) and Jean-Blaise EVEQUOZ. 111 Olympic athletes from 39 countries collectively produced 15 paintings, at the rate of one per day. Each individual painting represents one of the 15 Olympic winter sports. When arranged in three rows of five, the paintings become one painting revealing the Olympic values which are at the heart of this initiative.

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