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Date
06 Apr 2011
Tags
IOC News , Press Release

IOC sanctions track and field athlete Duane Ross for violating anti-doping rules at the Athens 2004 Olympic Games


The International Olympic Committee (IOC) today announced that USA track and field athlete Duane Ross has been disqualified from the men’s 110m hurdles event, in which he placed fifth in the semi-final heat at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games.

In April last year, the IOC was informed by the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) that Duane Ross used banned performance-enhancing drugs prior to 2001 as well as in 2001, 2002 and 2003.  USADA also said it had imposed a sanction and a loss of results on Ross from November 2001.

Based on this information, the IOC set up, in October 2010, a Disciplinary Commission (DC), consisting of Thomas Bach (Chairman), Denis Oswald and Frank Fredericks.

The DC noted that the athlete did not contest the USADA sanction of disqualification of all results since November 2001, which would include results obtained while competing at the Athens Olympic Games. It also observed that, under USADA rules, after notice and a certain amount of time, if the athlete does not contest the sanctions, such sanctions are imposed. The Commission therefore concluded that the athlete should be disqualified from the men’s 110m hurdles event at the Athens Olympic Games. The IAAF has been requested to modify the results accordingly and to consider any further action within its own competence.

Click here to read the full decision

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