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Date
07 Feb 2010
Tags
Vancouver 2010 , Olympic News

Aboriginal Youth Participate in Olympic Gathering

As a celebration of the world’s biggest potlatch, a group of up-and-coming young Aboriginal leaders from across Canada have gathered in British Columbia’s Sea-to-Sky region to take part in the Vancouver 2010 Indigenous Youth Gathering. The event brings together more than 300 First Nations, Inuit and Métis young people aged 19 to 29, and will be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be in Vancouver for the Games and to showcase their culture and region through a range of activities and special events.


Meet Sports Heroes

As part of the gathering, participants will tour Olympic venues, watch the world’s best athletes train and compete, and meet sports heroes, business leaders and Aboriginal elders in person. They will also take part in cultural performances at the 2010 Aboriginal Pavilion and in the Governor General’s 2010 Olympic Truce Youth Dialogue: Promoting Mutual Understanding, hosted by Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada, on 11 February. The Vancouver 2010 Indigenous Youth Gathering is part of a larger ongoing programme to achieve unprecedented Aboriginal participation in the planning and hosting of the 2010 Winter Games by the Four Host First Nations and the Vancouver Organising Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC), with the support of many partners.

Pillars of the Olympic Movement

The programming for the Vancouver 2010 Indigenous Youth Gathering, which runs until 14 February, is connected to the three pillars of the Olympic Movement: sport, culture, and environment, as well as the objectives of the Olympic Truce: youth, action, legacy, awareness, and peace. The participants stay in accommodation sites located in the pristine and breathtaking Paradise Valley of Squamish in the Sea-to-Sky region. The sites offer educational programmes on forestry and wildlife, salmon habitats, a bald eagle sanctuary, as well as traditional connections to the land.
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