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Date
12 Jan 2005
Tags
IOC News , museum-news-articles

2004: increase in the number of visitors to the Olympic Museum


After a quiet 2003, it seems that last year visitors returned to Olympic Museum at a good pace. Twenty per cent more people! We are again reaching the 200,000 entry ticket mark. Flagship exhibitions and interesting projects should allow us to maintain this upward trend!




Highlights 2004
Organised in the framework of the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad in Athens in August, the exhibitions, storytelling, guided tours, workshops, talks, demonstrations, theatre, dance and two world premieres, one an outdoor concert, succeeded in attracting many people throughout the year.




Numerous celebrities
Celebrities didn’t shy away from the Museum either. We have seen Larisa Latynina, the Ukrainian gymnast with 18 Olympic medals; Yaping Deng, the Chinese table tennis virtuoso; Swiss cyclist Robert Dill-Bundi, Olympic champion at the Moscow Games in 1980; Leroy Burrell, who set a world 100m record at the Athletissima event in 1994; and Manuela Di Centa, the friendly Olympic cross country skiing champion.




Pelé, the King
The biggest star was undisputedly the Brazilian Pelé, who came for a press conference and the preview of an exhibition entitled 100 Years of Planet Football last November. The kindness, spontaneity and charisma of this great gentleman of football attracted many journalists and fans of all ages.




Projects by the dozen for 2005
In future, the Olympic Museum will organise large temporary exhibitions every two years. From May 2005, the International Year of Sport, celebrated by the UN, will allow the institution to focus on the cultural roots of sport across the world. In parallel, an events programme will get underway with many activities planned. The traditional cycle of Museum Thursdays will be reviewed and altered. There will now be four annual Agoras organised by Jean-Philippe Rapp, the famous presenter of Zig Zag Café. What could be better?




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